A/it Opening

Gallery takes viewers on excursion to the abstract

, By EILEEN WATKINS
If you like your art truly abstract, you should love the latest three-person show at the Visitor Center of Thompson Park in Lincroft.
Few of the works ever come close to images of reality, the nearest being when the paintings by Bascha Mon suggest interiors. The average viewer might argue that, for such a large exhibit, this borders on too much abstraction, with nothing to balance the effect.
The media and styles do vary, however, and pleasantly.
Gloria Cernosia du Bouchet of East Brunswick works with collographs. Subterranean images are(
laged,” using a prominent strip of gauze to create a sweeping movement.
“Hearts and Flowers” provides the symbolic reference points of a row of yellow hearts, an abstract garden and the faint outline of an iron gate; “Home at Last” suggests the frames of doors or windows. But in general the viewer will be content to absorb the sunny, upbeat feeling the works create without making literal translations.
Most of the mixed-media pieces by Natalie Craig of Long Branch are included in her “One to One: A Suite of Formalities.” Using pastel, pencil, thread and vellum, she takes advantage of the natural irregularities of the materials and their interaction.
Craig colors the background material, sometimes a sheet of newspaper, with pastel of charcoal, then places vellum over it for a distant, blurred effect. Sometimes the vellum is attached with glue, at other times it is sewn on.
A “foreground” is created when the artist draws or paints sharper and more brightly colored lines on top of the vellum. Sometimes these lines are short and straight and can scarcely be distinguished from the stitching.
When you are in the mood for a total excursion into abstract, drop down to Thompson Park, on Newman Springs Road in Lincroft. The three-artist show remains on view through May 28.

A/it Opening

evoked by her groupings of hard-edged bands that contain dense black-and-white or brown-and-white textury patterns.
“Eight on the Richter Scale” involves seven of these bands, or narrow rectangles, standing vertically, while a red line runs down and through them like a rupture. Several works in a series called “Temporal Steps” portray either vertical or horizontal groupings of these forms with one band slightly out of kilter, and contrasting in color, either solid black or patterned brown.
* * *
A few of the prints use more solid areas of black and white, with hard lines only at the outer edges. They contain churning patterns and have titles such as “Maelstrom” and “Norfolk Landscape”; one divided by a continuous white “tunnel” is called “Kinks, Curls and Convolutions.”
As a change from this crisp technique, painter Bascha Mon of Long Valley uses soft tones and misty outlines. Her canvases and mixed-media works have a general resemblance to rooms and occasionally exteriors of buildings, distorted as in a memory.
* * *
Her large oils such as “Sissy, Cabbages and Friendship,” “Cross-References” and “Ritual” use loosely geometric areas, chiefly quadrangles with slanting vertical borders. The colors are all soft and similar in value; various depths and textures are indicated by stripes, curlicues and speckles, as well as by painting one tone over another.
Mon adds bits of canvas and paper to her larger works only with restraint. “Flight” is the most “col-